Wednesday, 27 February 2013


I believe fully that one must follow one's heart no matter what society or family or friends or teachers might tell you. Follow your heart and then you will control your profession and not the other way around. Do not ever become plastic dolls - male or female -- to fit into a profession. let the profession fit into you. unless there is this fire or passion within oneself the profession will take over the person and then we are bogged down with all the protocol, the artificiality, the built up flair that supposedly MUST go along a profession. If one controls the profession because we have followed our dreams dictated to us by our hearts and not the heads of others, then and then only will passion enter our profession and then and only then will your work be truly loved by others and not considered work - I mean work as a burden. I have noticed that many parents push their kids into streams they don't like or by accident students choose subjects they don't like and then we call them failures! well they are not really failures - they are folks who have not followed their hearts!
During my years of teaching I have  come across friends and colleagues who are extremely passionate about their profession. They are the ones who have chased their dreams and have had a vision and hence a mission cemented by the fire or can I say the passion that burns within a person to do something good for society. Such passions can be for any profession - be it  medicine, engineering, theater, music, art, etc... However if it has been thrust upon us --- it remains thrust upon us-- as a burden --not that which one has striven for from within. This then makes the difference in the quality of output. 
Hence before recruiting staff for any profession it would be wise to select the person not necessarily only with the qualifications in mind, but also from observation - as to whether the person is 
1. Cut out for the job, 
2. Has a passion that has driven oneself to the profession. 
3. Is not pretending to be possessing that passion!
I have had some very passionate and not so passionate teachers. It is for the latter that the burden of the profession is so heavy that the job gives them no satisfaction (except for the pay packet). It is in such cases that the quality drops.The burdensome 'job' becomes a baggage they carry along up to their retirement. In the process they put others on the receiving end through boredom, torture and agony. Let us be wary of such recruits for they tend to be a terrible drain on an institution!
                                                                   ~~~Crystal David John